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Coles relaunches ‘Down Down’ campaign to lower cost of weekly shops

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Coles has relaunched its price-dropping ‘Down Down’ campaign in an effort to bring the cost of Australian’s weekly shop down.

The campaign, which focuses on lowering the cost of hundreds of products across Coles’ entire product range, comes as the economic fallout of the pandemic continues to hit lower socio-economic Australians the hardest.

“A lot of Australian families are looking to get better value from their weekly budget, and with people still eating more meals at home we want to deliver great prices on the quality food our customers want to eat for breakfast, lunch and dinner,” Coles chief executive of commercial and express Greg Davis said.

“Over the past 10 years customers have come to recognise Down Down and the Big Red Hand as indicators of trusted value at Coles, and our rollout of further Down Down prices lets them know that we are more committed than ever to lowering the cost of their weekly shop.”

An Oxfam report released earlier this year found while the world’s richest saw their wealth expand during the pandemic, it may take more than a decade for poorer people to recover from the economic impacts.

The Inequality Virus report also found that the pandemic has caused one of, if not the, worst jobs crisis of the last century – with hundreds of millions of people underemployed or out of work across the globe.

“We stand to witness the greatest rise in inequality since records began,” Oxfam Australia chief executive Lyn Morgan Oxfam said, according to the ABC.

“The deep divide between the rich and the poor is proving as deadly as the virus, [and] while the [Australian] Government should be congratulated for acting quickly to implement wage subsidies and other social protection measures last year, the inappropriate and unfair reversal of the increase to JobSeeker payments is a cruel blow to the poorest Australians.”

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