CHOICE launches campaign against latest product industry proposal

Choice TimTamCHOICE has announced their latest campaign against a recent industry proposal to remove product weight from front packaging.

Product quantity statements will be removed from the front of popular consumer goods packaging.

Consumer group said it will make it harder for shoppers to find and compare value for money on the shelves.

“You only have to look at the inconsistent sizing across products from companies like Cadbury’s and Arnott’s to realise how confusing it is for consumers to compare products,” said CHOICE head of media Tom Godfrey.

“Cadbury’s family chocolate blocks may look the same but their weights fluctuate. For example, fans of Cadbury’s Marvellous Creations range can end up paying the same for a bar that weighs 18% less simply by picking Spider Choc Raspberry over Jelly Popping Candy Beanies.

“Biscuit lovers might be shocked to learn that if they buy Arnott’s Chewy Caramel Tim Tams instead of the Tim Tam Originals they’ll end up with 25 grams less, or 9 biscuits instead of 11.”

“The erratic changes in weight across similar looking packs are likely to confuse consumers and illustrate why it’s vital the pack weight stays on the front of a product,” said Godfrey.

“The sad fact is some food companies can’t be trusted when it comes to pack claims and it’s not uncommon to see the size of products reduced but the price remain the same.”

CHOICE found comparing similar looking products from different companies can also prove difficult.

“Mama Lucia’s Mini Bocconcinni comes in a bigger pack than La Casa Del Formaggio’s Bambini Bocconcini, but if you buy the larger tub you’ll end up with 40 grams less, ” said Godfrey.

The National Measurement Institute (NMI) is set to consider proposals by junk food and cosmetic companies who are pushing to remove the current mandatory quantity measurement from the front of their products.

“There’s no good reason for companies to be given permission to remove the quantity statements from the front of their products,” he said.

“Our research has also shown hiding the quantity information on the back of pack is likely to short change 74 per cent of people who consider it important. Yet industry argues their proposal is designed to remove red tape.

“Front of pack quantity statements also allow consumers to look past deceptive pack sizes and colours, and with unit pricing not mandatory in all shops this information is essential.”

Currently, Australian weights and measure laws, and an international recommendation that Australia has signed on to, require that quantity statements are located on the front label of packages, where it is easy for consumers to notice, read and compare figures.

The NMI is consulting on the change until the end of June. CHOICE is calling on consumers to write to the NMI to save front of pack weights at choice.com.au/weightywarning.

Comments

3 comments

  1. Richard posted on June 2, 2017

    Couldn't agree more that there appears to be no logical reason for removing product weight from front to back of pack... there is no red tape reduction by doing so. It can only be driven by a desire to make weight less obvious to consumers so that consumers can't compare products easily (which benefits those who make big pack sizes, but with less content). Having said that, the insinuation by Choice that reducing product size and retaining the same prize is only ever a nasty trick is not right. Sometimes size of product can be changed due to customer feedback, but equally if the cost of a product has increased, a smaller version at the same price may be a more attractive solution for consumers than increased unit price. Choice would do much better to focus on facts, rather than make any claim or unbased opinion just to stir up the pot.

  2. Richard posted on June 2, 2017

    Couldn't agree more that there appears to be no logical reason for removing product weight from front to back of pack... there is no red tape reduction by doing so. It can only be driven by a desire to make weight less obvious to consumers so that consumers can't compare products easily (which benefits those who make big pack sizes, but with less content). Having said that, the insinuation by Choice that reducing product size and retaining the same price is only ever a nasty trick is a sensationalist claim. Sometimes size of product can be changed due to customer feedback, but equally if the cost of a product has increased, a smaller version at the same price may be a more attractive solution for consumers than increased unit price. Choice would do much better to focus on facts, rather than shout out any claim or baseless opinion just to stir up the pot and encourage misguided distrust.

  3. Peter posted on June 2, 2017

    Absolutely stupid idea removing the weight, the only benefit to removing the weight will be to the companies, I use the weights on the front all the time as l dont trust any of the brands anymore. Seriously absurd cannot believe NMI are even considering it.

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