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Helga’s claims bread sector first in sustainability achievement

Goodman Fielder’s bread brand Helga’s says it has reached its target of using 100-per-cent sustainable energy four years ahead of target and – in a category first – achieved fully recyclable packaging at the same time. 

All plastic packaging for Helga’s loaves, rolls and wraps is from this month 100-per-cent recyclable through RedCycle at participating stores, meaning customers can return their empty bags for repurposing into new products.

The company says it will follow the initiative by switching from plastic bread bag ties to paper ones next month. 

“Our focus on reducing the impact of packaging and plastic waste starts with design and innovation,” explained head of sustainability at Goodman Fielder, Mick Anderson. “This includes reducing the plastic content of our bags by 25 per cent.”

“At Helga’s, our 100-per-cent recyclable bags mean we’re reducing waste to landfill and contributing to new products being created from the recovered plastic. We want to educate and enable consumers on how they can participate in that process, helping to potentially recycle more than 62 million bags each year.”

Of course, this success relies on consumers and businesses buying Helga’s products actually recycling the bags and not disposing of them in garbage bags destined for landfills.

On July 1, Goodman Fielder’s bakeries switched to 100-per-cent renewable electricity – well ahead of its original 2025 target for converting, something Anderson described as “a critical step” in the company’s sustainability journey.

“By using renewable electricity at our Goodman Fielder operated sites, we are moving closer to our target of net-zero carbon emissions by 2040, reducing our own and our consumer’s climate impact.”

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